"Apple’s core skill is not innovation but refinement. The company didn’t make the first smartphone, just the best one. Many tablets were tried, but only Apple’s opened up a category. Several smartwatches are on the market, but Apple is the one that people beyond geeks are paying attention to."

The Magic in Apple’s Devices? The Heart - NYTimes.com

archiemcphee:

Denver, CO-based artists Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker, collectively known as Hari & Deepti (previously featured here), have created a brand new series of their fantastically-themed and exquisitely detailed paper light box sculptures. Entitled “Oh, The Places You Will Go!”, these pieces are currently being shown as part of an exhibition at the Black Book Gallery in Denver.

"The artist couple were inspired by recent travels through Moab, Utah and Yellowstone, Wyoming, and transformed elements of their adventures into delicately hand-cut paper sculptures infused with mythology and science fiction. Each piece is lit from behind or below with LED strips and the boxes are exhibited in dark rooms to enhance the effect."

Hari & Deepti will also be showing work this December at Art Basel Miami 2014 for the Scope International Contemporary Art Show.

To check out more of Hari & Deepti’s wonderful creations visit the Black Book Gallery website and keep up with their latest work on Instagram

[via Colossal]

archiemcphee:

Twin Brazilian street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, collectively known as Os Gêmeos (previously featured here), just completed this awesomely huge, vibrant and detailed piece covering six towering silos on Granville island in Vancouver, Canada for the Vancouver Biennale. These massive Giants are the brothers’ largest work to date.They spent three months painting the 75-foot-tall industrial towers in their distinctive colorful style, full of smaller hidden characters. A successful Indiegogo fundraising campaign helped the brothers cover the expenses needed to complete this non-profit public art project.

The twins spent the final days adding numerous details to their characters – pockets, stitches, buttons, shoes, fabric patterns, all by using lots of bright colors and by painting more and more signature yellow faces. Using the architecture of the silos, the giants are all kneeling with four of them facing one way, and the other two facing the other way, giving the finished work a full 360 degree identity.

Visit StreetArtNews and Arrested Motion for additional images of this amazing installation.

Tags: art amazing kids

"

ISPs sometimes point to data showing that Netflix members account for about 30% of peak residential Internet traffic, so the ISPs want us to share in their costs. But they don’t also offer for Netflix or similar services to share in the ISPs revenue, so cost-sharing makes no sense. When an ISP sells a consumer a 10 or 50 megabits-per-second Internet package, the consumer should get that rate, no matter where the data is coming from.

Some ISPs say that Netflix is unilaterally “dumping as much volume” (Verizon CFO) as it wants onto their networks. Netflix isn’t “dumping” data; it’s satisfying requests made by ISP customers who pay a lot of money for high speed Internet. Netflix doesn’t send data unless members request a movie or TV show.

Interestingly, there is one special case where no-fee interconnection is embraced by the big ISPs — when they are connecting among themselves. They argue this is because roughly the same amount of data comes and goes between their networks. But when we ask them if we too would qualify for no-fee interconnect if we changed our service to upload as much data as we download** — thus filling their upstream networks and nearly doubling our total traffic — there is an uncomfortable silence. That’s because the ISP argument isn’t sensible. Big ISPs aren’t paying money to services like online backup that generate more upstream than downstream traffic. Data direction, in other words, has nothing to do with costs.

"

Internet Tolls And The Case For Strong Net Neutrality

yes, Netflix has a vested interest in avoiding tolls - but I also cannot see a reasonable case for being able to charge your customers for access to the Internet, and then charge the sites that they request traffic from to deliver that traffic to them. Your paying customers requested the traffic; why should you (the ISP) have to be paid twice to deliver it?

"

Peering is the face of this issue — the idea that Internet Service Provider A allow traffic from similarly sized and loaded networks to traverse its own for free because ISP A‘s traffic gets a pass when it’s on networks owned by ISP B or ISP C. However, the soul of this issue is how it exposes how uncompetitive the nation’s broadband networks really are. The very threat that Level 3 alleges Comcast made — essentially that Level 3 could accept the proposed fee or Comcast wouldn’t deliver Level 3’s content — should lead to concern.

This is a problem the Congress and regulators cannot ignore. Just as in the recent retransmission fights in the pay TV world, these rumblings between giant companies leaves consumers in the lurch, even though they’ve actually paid for access to the Internet — that is, the whole Internet, not one approved by Comcast or some other company.

"

Forget Net Neutrality; Comcast Might Break the Web

paid peering is secretive and complex, but turf wars and fights over who can extract the most money from who to deliver content that was requested by customers who are already paying for the service threaten to balkanize the Internet before government censors get a chance to.

lessig:

image

I received this nastygram by email today from Scott Brown’s campaign manager — cc-ing my boss, the provost and president.

I take it Mr. Reed’s outrage is triggered by the Senate’s regulations of what constitutes being a “lobbyist” for purposes of the Senate rules. I hadn’t received the memo…

flowchart of the relationship of various branches of mathematics - found via twitter (IIRC) but source unknown and unfortunately not listed. If you know the author, please let me know; I’d love to give credit.

flowchart of the relationship of various branches of mathematics - found via twitter (IIRC) but source unknown and unfortunately not listed. If you know the author, please let me know; I’d love to give credit.

"

This kind of negative personality criticism—watch your tone! step back! stop being so judgmental!—shows up twice in the 83 critical reviews received by men. It shows up in 71 of the 94 critical reviews received by women.

There’s a common perception that women in technology endure personality feedback that their male peers just don’t receive. Words like bossy, abrasive, strident, and aggressive are used to describe women’s behaviors when they lead; words like emotional and irrational describe their behaviors when they object. All of these words show up at least twice in the women’s review text I reviewed, some much more often. Abrasive alone is used 17 times to describe 13 different women. Among these words, only aggressive shows up in men’s reviews at all. It shows up three times, twice with an exhortation to be more of it.

"

Performance review gender bias: High-achieving women are ‘abrasive’ - Fortune