substitute:

This sad and beautiful picture is making the rounds today. I thought a credit would be helpful; it’s from the now defunct Rocky Mountain News, and part of a Pulitzer-winning special report. A memorial both to the war dead, and to the dead newspaper that won’t be bringing us this again. Article and photos by Jim Sheeler and Todd Heisler.

The night before the burial of her husband’s body, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, asking to sleep next to his body for the last time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of “Cat,” and one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept. “I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it,” she said. “I think that’s what he would have wanted.”

substitute:

This sad and beautiful picture is making the rounds today. I thought a credit would be helpful; it’s from the now defunct Rocky Mountain News, and part of a Pulitzer-winning special report. A memorial both to the war dead, and to the dead newspaper that won’t be bringing us this again. Article and photos by Jim Sheeler and Todd Heisler.

The night before the burial of her husband’s body, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, asking to sleep next to his body for the last time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of “Cat,” and one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept. “I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it,” she said. “I think that’s what he would have wanted.”

"To rid the world of Osama bin Laden, Anwar al-Awlaki and Moammar Qaddafi within six months: if Obama were a Republican, he’d be on Mount Rushmore by now."

Andrew Sullivan (via soupsoup)

curiositycounts:

NEVER FOREVER NEVER FOR NOW – a quantitative visualisation of the transient nature of empire, graphing all known empires, colonies and territorial occupations from 2334 BCE to the present day  (via)

curiositycounts:

NEVER FOREVER NEVER FOR NOW – a quantitative visualisation of the transient nature of empire, graphing all known empires, colonies and territorial occupations from 2334 BCE to the present day  (via)

(via curiositycounts)

theatlantic:

Today marks the 10th anniversary of the Afghanistan War. This occasion should prompt Americans to consider a simple question: How’s it going?

“It,” of course, refers to much more than Afghanistan.

After all, the campaign launched on October 7, 2001 to destroy Al Qaeda and overthrow the Taliban soon metastasized. Beyond the unnecessary diversion into Iraq, the enterprise once known as the Global War on Terror now finds U. S. military and intelligence forces engaged in places as far afield as Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya.

Over the past decade thousands of American soldiers have been killed, and thousands grievously wounded in body and spirit. Pentagon spending has more than doubled, reaching levels not seen since World War II. Estimated costs of “the long war” now reach well into the trillions. And there is no end in sight. Senior military officers no longer bother to promise victory. Instead, in the words of General George Casey, they consign the United States to an era of “persistent conflict.”

That American warriors are brave and skillful is beyond doubt. Still, as presently configured, our armed forces achieve indifferent results while costing American taxpayers exorbitant amounts.

So again: How’s it going?

Naval Postgraduate School professor John Arquilla, Boston University’s  Andrew Bacevich, national correspondent James Fallows, and former United States Senator. Gary Hart evaluate the War in Afghanistan, 10 years later. Read more at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

September in Afghanistan

Ten Years. Troops from the United States and other coalition forces have now been in Afghanistan for a decade, following the initial bombing raids carried out by the U.S. on October 7, 2001. My father served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, and I remember a conversation I had with him shortly after the attacks of September 11, where he said to me, “Son, I really hoped your generation wouldn’t have to go through something like this.” There are teenagers now who were just toddlers when their parents first deployed to Afghanistan. As a photo editor, I’ve been curating an entry about Afghanistan once a month for the past two years, and plan to continue to do so. The U.S. and some 35 other coalition nations currently have more than 130,000 soldiers stationed in Afghanistan, and it’s important for us to see what they are dealing with, what we’ve asked them to do for so long — and to see those who are so directly affected by this long conflict, the Afghan people themselves. Although the U.S. has been involved for a decade, the people of Afghanistan have known nothing but war for more than 30 years now. 

See more photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

September in Afghanistan

Ten Years. Troops from the United States and other coalition forces have now been in Afghanistan for a decade, following the initial bombing raids carried out by the U.S. on October 7, 2001. My father served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, and I remember a conversation I had with him shortly after the attacks of September 11, where he said to me, “Son, I really hoped your generation wouldn’t have to go through something like this.” There are teenagers now who were just toddlers when their parents first deployed to Afghanistan. As a photo editor, I’ve been curating an entry about Afghanistan once a month for the past two years, and plan to continue to do so. The U.S. and some 35 other coalition nations currently have more than 130,000 soldiers stationed in Afghanistan, and it’s important for us to see what they are dealing with, what we’ve asked them to do for so long — and to see those who are so directly affected by this long conflict, the Afghan people themselves. Although the U.S. has been involved for a decade, the people of Afghanistan have known nothing but war for more than 30 years now. 

See more photos at In Focus

(Source: bijouxnoir, via seashelllz)

Tags: truth war

Panetta Says Wars Should Only End When There’s No Terrorists Left In A Country, But Al Qaeda Is In 70 Countries

because clearly (as history shows), military force is an effective way to put an end to terrorism.

Panetta Says Wars Should Only End When There’s No Terrorists Left In A Country, But Al Qaeda Is In 70 Countries

because clearly (as history shows), military force is an effective way to put an end to terrorism.

"It turned out that our five-man team had as many Korean speakers as Arabic ones — you know, for all the Korean spoken in the Iraqi desert. It was my first sign that the deployment wouldn’t be the one I trained for."

— Max Rosenthal, a trained Army linguist who was sent to Iraq only to have his skills go unused as contractors were paid a much higher salary to do his job. Read the whole story of how the Army is wasting the talents of linguists over at Danger Room. (via govtoversight)

(via govtoversight)

Tags: army news iraq war

"

In 2010, Rethink Afghanistan created a tool on [Facebook] that allowed you to re-spend, as you saw fit, the trillion dollars in tax money that had, by that point, been spent on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I clicked to add various items to my “shopping cart” and then checked to see what I’d acquired. I was able to hire every worker in Afghanistan for a year at $12 billion, build 3 million affordable housing units in the United States for $387 billion, provide healthcare for a million average Americans for $3.4 billion and for a million children at $2.3 billion.

Still within the $1 trillion limit, I managed to also hire a million music/arts teachers for a year for $58.5 billion, and a million elemtary school teachers for a year for $61.1 billion. I also placed a million kids in Head Start for a year for $7.3 billion. Then I gave 10 million students a one-year university scholarship for $79 billion. Finally, I decided to provide 5 million residences with renewable energy for $4.8 billion. Convinced I’d exceeded my spending limits, I proceeded to the shopping cart, only to be advised:

‘You still have $384.5 billion to spare.’

[…]

A trillion dollars sure does go a long way when you don’t have to kill anybody.

"

—David Swanson, War Is A Lie (via dceiver)

Jesus weeps.  Undercover Nun weeps with him.

(via undercovernun)

(via undercovernun)